Trench

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5-6
Trench
Backdrop160tp.png
Std structure trench.gif
2
Effects:
  • Gives a slight boost to defense (similar to sand-bags);
  • Cannot be destroyed.
Description:
A permanent construction that offers average protection against bullets. A grenade can kill everyone in a trench if it lands inside.

A trench is a defensive structure that provides average protection against bullets and cannot be destroyed. Grenades and other explosions do more damage to soldiers in a trench. It can be teamed up with a Bunker for increased protection and damage resistance.

Fun Facts

  • When placed, its angle is generated randomly, and may come out above or below where you placed it. Provides average bullet protection and gives you that false safe feeling.
  • Adding sandbag walls to it will give it more protection from bullet and explosive damage.
  • Overcrowding trenches is asking for a Panzergrenadier to clear them out, so be careful!
  • Snipers are said to do worse in trenches.
  • When you place a trench some things will come around it such as soda cans, wooden boxes and ammo boxes.
  • Trenches were used extensively in WW1.

Real Life

Trench warfare is a form of occupied fighting lines, consisting largely of trenches, in which troops are largely immune to the enemy's small arms fire and are substantially sheltered from artillery. It has become a byword for attrition warfare, for stalemate in conflict, with a slow wearing down of opposing forces. Trench warfare occurred when a military revolution in firepower was not matched by similar advances in mobility, resulting in a grueling form of warfare in which the defense held the advantage. In World War I, both sides constructed elaborate trench and dugout systems opposing each other along a front, protected from assault by barbed wire. The area between opposing trench lines (known as "no man's land") was fully exposed to artillery fire from both sides. Attacks, even if successful, often sustained severe casualties as a matter of course.

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